Press Release
| Bob Salera

McCaskill fights for higher taxes

Claire McCaskill is becoming increasingly vocal against President Trump’s tax reform plan, but isn’t talking about her own abysmal record on taxes.

McCaskill has previously come under fire for failing to pay $287,000 in taxes on her private plane. That was the same plane she was flying on when she billed taxpayers for nearly $76,000. After getting caught in the act, McCaskill had her husband sell the plane for nearly $2 million (before subsequently buying a brand new $3 million plane).

But despite not paying her own taxes, McCaskill has consistently supported higher taxes for Missouri families. In 2002, McCaskill supported a $511 million tax hike in Missouri that would have raised both the state sales tax and gas tax. And in the Senate, McCaskill has voted for higher income taxes, a higher capital gains tax, and a higher death tax.

“Claire McCaskill has as much credibility talking about taxes as her good friend Hillary Clinton has on cybersecurity,” said NRSC Spokesman Bob Salera. “McCaskill has a long history of avoiding paying her own taxes, but when it comes to Missouri families, she’s standing firmly with Washington liberals against President Trump’s tax cut plan.”

 

Background:

In May 2002, Missouri Lawmakers Placed A $511 Million Tax Hike Package For Roads On The State Ballot (Prop B). The Kansas City Star Called The  Package “One Of The Largest Tax Increases In State History.” “(Lawmakers) passed a $511 million funding package for the state’s deteriorating highways that, if approved by voters, would be one of the largest tax increases in state history. Because the bill calls for a referendum, it does not need Gov. Bob Holden’s signature and will be placed on the Aug. 6 ballot. … The proposal would ask Missourians to boost the state’s sales tax by a half cent, from its current 4.225 cents. Voters also would be asked to raise the state’s fuel tax 4 cents to 21 cents a gallon. (The Kansas City Star, 5/18/02)

In August 2002, A McCaskill Spokesperson Said She Supported Prop B. “A spokeswoman for McCaskill, a Democrat who has expressed interest in a 2008 gubernatorial run, said simply that ‘Claire is in favor of Prop B.’” (Josh Flory, “Assorted State Senate Primaries,” Columbia Daily Tribune, 8/3/02).

In July 2012, McCaskill Voted Against Extending The Bush Tax Cuts For All Income Levels For One Year. “McConnell, R-Ky., substitute amendment no. 2573 that would extend the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts for all income levels for one year. It also would extend estate tax levels, with a 35 percent on estates worth more than $5 million. The substitute also would extend alternative minimum tax provisions through 2013.” (S.Amdt. 2573 to S. 3412, Roll Call Vote #183: Rejected 45-54, 7/25/12, McCaskill Voted Nay; CQ Summary, Accessed 1/15/16)

In December 2012, McCaskill Voted For Cloture On A Bill That Would Have Let The Bush Tax Cuts Expire For Individuals With Income Over $200,000 And Joint Filers With Income Over $250,000. “Motion to invoke cloture (thus limiting debate) on the Reid, D-Nev., motion to concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment with a further Baucus, D-Mont., substitute amendment no. 4727 that would make permanent the 2001- and 2003-enacted tax cuts on income up to $200,000 for individuals and $250,000 for married couples filing joint returns. The extensions would include current lower tax rates for capital gains and dividends, elimination of the ‘marriage penalty’ and an expansion of the increased child tax credit. It also would extend unemployment insurance benefits for 13 months.” (H.R. 4853, Roll Call Vote #258: Motion Rejected 53-36, 12/4/10, McCaskill Voted Yea; CQ Summary, Accessed 1/15/16)

In July 2012, McCaskill Voted To Let The Bush Tax Cuts Expire For Individuals With Income Over $200,000 And Joint Filers With Income Over $250,000. “Passage of the bill that would extend the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts for one year on taxable income of up to $200,000 for single filers or up to $250,000 for joint filers. The bill would set the tax rate for adjusted gross income above $250,000 at 33 percent and for adjusted gross income above $400,000 at 35 percent. It also would expand the child tax credit and extend the college tuition tax credit and the earned-income tax credit. It would set tax rates for long-term capital gains and dividends at 20 percent. The bill also would allow a business property deduction of $250,000 and extend the alternative minimum tax provisions for 2012 income.” (S. 3412, Roll Call Vote #184: Passed 51-48, 7/25/12, McCaskill Voted Yea; CQ Summary, Accessed 1/15/16)

In April 2009, McCaskill Voted For Obama’s FY2010 Budget, Which Would Have Instituted A 45 Percent Death Tax, With An Exemption Level Of $3.5 Million. “Adoption of the conference report on the concurrent resolution that would allow up to $1.086 trillion in non-emergency discretionary spending for fiscal 2010, plus $130 billion in fiscal 2010 for operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. It would assume $764 billion in tax cuts over five years, including an extension of the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts for households earning less than $250,000 annually, a three-year adjustment to prevent additional taxpayers from paying the alternative minimum tax and a permanent extension of the 2009 estate tax levels. It includes reconciliation instructions to House and Senate committees to report a total of $2 billion in savings, presumably from health care and student loan programs, by Oct. 15. It would create a deficit-neutral reserve fund for health care and climate change legislation.” (S. Con. Res. 13, Roll Call Vote #173: Adopted 53-43, 4/29/09, McCaskill Voted Yea; CQ Summary, Accessed 1/15/16)

In January 2013, McCaskill Voted For The Fiscal Cliff Package That Raised The Capital Gains Tax Rate And The Death Tax Rate. “It also would permanently extend the tax rates on dividends and capital gains for individual income below $400,000 and joint-filer income below $450,000. Rates for the dividends and capital gains taxes would rise to 20 percent for income above those thresholds…It also would tax individual estates valued over $5 million and joint estates valued over $10 million at 40 percent.” (H.R. 8, Roll Call Vote #251: Passed 89-8, 1/1/13, McCaskill Voted Yea)

In July 2012, McCaskill Voted For Legislation That Would Increase The Capital Gains Tax At 20 Percent. “Passage of the bill that would extend the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts for one year on taxable income of up to $200,000 for single filers or up to $250,000 for joint filers. The bill would set the tax rate for adjusted gross income above $250,000 at 33 percent and for adjusted gross income above $400,000 at 35 percent. It also would expand the child tax credit and extend the college tuition tax credit and the earned-income tax credit. It would set tax rates for long-term capital gains and dividends at 20 percent. The bill also would allow a business property deduction of $250,000 and extend the alternative minimum tax provisions for 2012 income.” (S. 3412, Roll Call Vote #184: Passed 51-48, 7/25/12, McCaskill Voted Yea; CQ Summary, Accessed 4/16/17)